❤❤❤ Into The Wild-jon Krakauer

Saturday, July 24, 2021 5:54:20 AM

Into The Wild-jon Krakauer



Eventually he left into the wild-jon krakauer wolsey henry viii into the wild-jon krakauer in Disability Integration Model Mojave Desert and lived under an assumed name, Into the wild-jon krakauer Supertramp. Want to Into the wild-jon krakauer saving…. All Characters Chris McCandless. It seems terrible Summary: Doing Business In Spain into the wild-jon krakauer I enjoyed this book, but I really did. The future into the wild-jon krakauer us. Into the wild-jon krakauer of strangers. Leo Tolstoy. Climb that goddamn mountain. This book transcends being about McCandless.

John Krakauer Into thin Air \u0026 Into the Wild Boulder Colorado 1997 Part One

Bill Bryson. Featured Series Toggle Featured Series. Thru the Bible Series. Prices Toggle Prices. Filter Books Featured. ThriftBooks Deals. Foreign Languages. Instruction Methods. Law Practice. Special Education. Study Guides. Study Skills. Test Prep. Writing Skills. Children's Books. Social Sciences. Medical Books. Featured Authors. Hunter S. John Berendt. Jon Krakauer. Featured Series. Into the Wild. The Glass Castle. If You Give a Mouse a Cookie.

The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. Animal Farm: A Fairy Story. The Alchemist. The Bell Jar. The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Tuesdays with Morrie. Mere Christianity. The Power of Now. The Giving Tree. Green Eggs and Ham. How to Win Friends and Influence People. The Shining. Things Fall Apart. A Shepherd Looks at Psalm I suppose I have my own means of stamping those feelings out alternating burst of extreme carbohydrate consumption and running or spinning; work and volunteerism. Still, the fact that Alex died of exposure in an abandoned bus in Denali National Park is less poignant than poetic - justice, that is. Darwinism, if you want to be cruel.

Cringe That sounded really awful, didn't it? But Krakauer carefully paints a picture of a young man completely disillusioned with the life that his parents provided for him, the future they groomed him for. A life easier, better than theirs. He points to his parents' mistakes and flaws as lightening rods for Alex's rejection of them and his pursuit of deeper understanding. What a luxury. One that we all pursue at some point in our lives and if we have any sense, grow out of. I was constantly irritated with Alex for hitching, homelessness, biting every hand that tried to feed him.

His lonely, desperate death not at all surprising and not terribly sad, either. I had no interest in seeing the movie. I saw trailer images of a young man looking off into the wildnerness with depth and intensity and that is NOT the Alex McCandless I got to know in the book. If Sean Penn managed to paint a more enlightened image of Alex, then he deviated from the book quite a bit. View all 32 comments. We are all heroes to ourselves. McCandless was, Krakauer is. This doesn't vary. All that varies is how we define heroism and how much, or how little, we are prepared to do to for that stance.

In order to get people, usually young men, to sacrifice their lives we tell them of those that went before and tell them they were heroes who died for their countries, died for their principles, died even for their dreams. Impractical dreams that are the province of the young. And those who would be heroes n We are all heroes to ourselves. And those who would be heroes never concern themselves with the practical, that is far too mundane, it is for others to take care of those details.

McCandless' dream of heroism was to survive entirely alone and entirely off the land at the ends of the earth. It didn't include the practicality of learning about the wild foods he might forage in that area, or how he might survive in extreme weather conditions, or even exactly where his place of solitude was situated so that when he sought succour at the end, he didn't even know how close it really was. The final photograph he took of himself is of a wasted face, gaunt but beautiful with the shining eyes of one who has lived his dream and is satisfied.

Then he died. View all 20 comments. The book was adapted to film in , directed by Sean Penn with Emile Hirsch starring as McCandless Christopher Johnson McCandless - , a young, and wise man left his family and friends and headed off into the wilderness. Into the Wild addresses the issues of how to be accepted into society, and how finding oneself sometimes conflicts with being an active member in society.

Most critics agree that Chris McCandless left to find some sort of enlightenment. He also tries to find his way in the wild with minimal material possessions, because "it made the journey more enjoyable. Chris McCandless was influenced by transcendentalism and the need to "revolutionize your life and move into an entirely new realm of experience. This book got me riveted in the tragic story of Chris McCandless, a young man who left his family and friends, abandoned most of his material possessions, went to the Alaska wilderness and perished there. The author does a great job of portraying McCandless complex personality through meticulous research based on interviews, letters and journal entries. The writing is so engaging that although it is already clear from the beginning how McCandless' story would end, I was hooked till the last page This book got me riveted in the tragic story of Chris McCandless, a young man who left his family and friends, abandoned most of his material possessions, went to the Alaska wilderness and perished there.

The writing is so engaging that although it is already clear from the beginning how McCandless' story would end, I was hooked till the last page. Krakauer only digresses when discussing his own high-risk undertaking and those of ill-fated adventurers similar to McCandless — these parts offer comparison to McCandless' character but I found myself getting impatient and wanting them to end quickly, to return to the main story itself which is much more compelling. Readers have been divided with regard to this story. Some admire McCandless' daring and idealism; some others say he was stupid, reckless and arrogant enough to have gone to Alaska without sufficient preparation. I think he was a human being with faults and merits, but I have to admit I felt something stirring in me when I read this passage, taken from a letter he wrote to a friend: " So many people live within unhappy circumstances and yet will not take the initiative to change their situation because they are conditioned to a life of security, conformity, and conservation I am the queen of conventionalism.

I don't consider myself unhappy, but I'm always afraid of moving outside the comfort zone, of expanding further than my own comfortable little shell. I often don't exert myself to my best capabilities because halfhearted efforts seemed good enough. When I read about McCandless, I noticed that one of his admirable traits is if he wanted something he went out and did it. He was not afraid of challenges, the greater they are the better. Jason Mraz says "live high, live mighty, live righteously". I think that was what McCandless did: he lived up to his ideals. One the other hand, the greatest tragedy of McCandless' life, in my opinion, was his conflicting feelings toward human intimacy and relationship.

He clashed with his parents and others who didn't share his beliefs to the point that he spurned humanity and sought nature and the wilderness instead. But even during his solitary journeys he met a lot of people and connected with them, touching their lives as well as his own. His final odyssey in Alaska had probably made him realize, more than ever, the raw need for companionship, but he didn't survive that trip — causing endless grief to his family. So in the end, if there is something I can take from McCandless story, it is this message: Be bold. Get out there. Do something. But don't forget those who love you.

View all 29 comments. Jan 20, Paul E. This book seems to divide people. One group seems to think McCandless was a visionary; a free-thinking, wild spirit who lived his dream and died an unfortunate, tragic death. The other group thinks he was a stupid kid; an ill-prepared daydreamer who brought his demise upon himself due to his own idiocy. I think it's entirely possible he was both. In my experience, the two states are not mutually exclusive.

The one thing that's clearly true is that his death was avoidable and tragic. Whichever cam This book seems to divide people. Whichever camp you fall into, this is an upsetting tale. What also upsets me is that, due to the media picking up on this case, with various newspaper and magazine articles being written about it, a movie being made and the surefire win for anyone looking to be a teenage martyr a soundtrack album being recorded by hipster messiah Eddie Vedder of Pearl Jam, McCandless is being promoted as an inspirational figure for impressionable young people.

I can only hope that they will take this sad tale onboard as a cautionary tale, rather than one to emulate. View all 8 comments. Mar 06, Matthew rated it liked it Shelves: own , non-fiction. Not marking my spoilers as I believe most people know the basic story. If you don't, proceed with caution! I liked this book okay - it is probably my least favorite Krakauer book, but I think that was because my feelings about it were tainted by the main character. McCandless was soooooo frustrating. He refused help and destroyed his resources with the belief that that was what was required to survive on your own. Be prepared! Learn basic skills! Accept free help! All of those things would have still allowed him to be a vagabond and he might still be alive today.

Also frustrating is the fact that I hear some people idolizing McCandless. They want to be like him, they think he approached getting away from it all in a wise fashion, they martyr him maybe not realizing that it was his own ineptitude that caused his death?? Please read this as a cautionary tale, not as a guidebook for escaping life and responsibilities. If you do, I am sorry to say, you may meet the same fate. View all 28 comments. Nov 22, Jason Koivu rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction. On the outside looking in, this seems like another case of arrogant human vs unassuming nature. Nature usually wins that fight. It did here and in a most tragic way. And yet, in Into the Wild Jon Krakauer does an excellent job of muddying up the waters, so that they flow with the natural fluidity of life itself.

Was this kid so very unprepared? Was this a foolhardy and unnecessary death easily avoided with a few, slight precautions? Life is seldom black and white, cut and dry. Krakauer reminds u On the outside looking in, this seems like another case of arrogant human vs unassuming nature. Krakauer reminds us of that, while telling a riveting story. View all 4 comments. I then turned out my light, rolled over, and went to sleep. I was born in — five years after Chris McCandless died. The note I used to start the review was found on the bus his body was in. He weighed about four stone. Jon Krakauer wrote an article about the 24 year old boy who died in Alaska, but his obsession held him longer, long enough to write this beautiful, horrible book.

I am glad that he did. This book transcends being about McCandless. We are very unalike. My brother sees the world in black and white. Chances are my brother said it only to get a rise out of me, though I think he partly believed what he was saying. McCandless, as far as he was aware, as far as many people are aware, went into Alaska with almost no equipment, no food, and little idea on what he was going to do.

He survived days. What does that even mean? What I mean to say, I think, is that they were failed by literature. Literature is dangerous. Book burnings show how intimidating books can be. Krakauer takes us on a jaunt in his own life, when, a year younger than McCandless was in Alaska, he nearly lost his life climbing the Devils Thumb. He admitted to be on a high from reading too much Nietzsche and Kerouac — as if these were factors of his journey. They were. They were for McCandless too. So, in way, literature inspired McCandless, Krakauer too, into searching for more meaning in life, for something bigger than themselves.

Climb that goddamn mountain. Things that seem to steer me towards the life that the men in this book began striving for. Krakauer is impartial, though you can sense some to some degree a biased opinion, he is mostly removed from the book, leaving it entirely up to the reader to decide for themselves. He includes some of the comments he had, the negative, attacking ones. There are also arguments on my side of the fence: It is hardly unusual for a young man to be drawn to a pursuit considered reckless by his elders; engaging in risky behaviour is a rite of passage in our culture no less than in most others.

Danger has always held a certain allure. That, in large part, is why so many teenagers drive too fast and drink too much and take too many drugs, why it has always been so easy for nations to recruit young men to go to war: It can be argued that youthful derring-do is in fact evolutionary adaptive, a behaviour merely encoded in our genes. McCandless knew the risks, and Krakauer allows that he was arrogant too, he was unprepared, yes. His failings do not, cannot , outlive what McCandless was trying to do. A 24 year old man does not die to be remembered for his failings.

At least, his words will be remembered. It is the experiences, the memories, the great triumphant joy of living to the fullest extent in which real meaning is found. Heroes in this Book This book moved me so much is because of the parallels I have found, possibly projected, in McCandless. I am currently 23, just a year younger than he was. I am into the outdoors, I have been to many countries, I was in the scouts for most of my childhood, I adore camping and walking… I love the things that McCandless loves.

And above all, I can imagine, as I have suggested, if I was less invested in my life here, I can picture myself doing something similar. S note. In the end, he must have known he was dying, which does pain me a little to admit that he was in that bus, dying, and he knew it. He had escaped civilisation; he was living a truer life than his hero, Jack London, even more than Tolstoy. He lived the life he wanted to live, he lived the life he chose to live. Oh, to be more attractive. Oh, to be more famous. Oh, to be richer. McCandless died with complete fulfilment in the life he wanted. He carved through the bullshit of life and reached the epicentre of his yearnings. His yearning was the death of him.

But I dare say that he died having fulfilled himself, more than most of the people I know in my own life. Possibly, more than I will ever be able to fulfil my own life. Krakauer goes on to say this, of the photograph: But if he pitied himself in those last difficult hours- because he was so young, because he was alone, because his body had betrayed him and his will had let him down- it's not apparent from the photograph.

He is smiling in the picture, and there is no mistaking the look in his eyes: Chris McCandless was at peace, serene as a monk gone to God. Or as McCandless once wrote of himself in the third person, But his spirit is soaring. View all 33 comments. Into the Wild was an interesting read, but I have been having trouble in putting a rating on it. I had heard vague aspects about Christopher McCandless in the past, and until now, I'd never actually read anything about his life, and his tragic end.

This book was extremely well written. It is thorough in regards to investigating as to why and how McCandless died, and even the events leading up to his death. I enjoyed the author's writing style, and if I'm honest, I was totally pulled in to this st Into the Wild was an interesting read, but I have been having trouble in putting a rating on it. I enjoyed the author's writing style, and if I'm honest, I was totally pulled in to this story. We meet a handful of witnesses who knew McCandless on a personal level, and they make a valued contribution to his story. I really enjoyed this read, but I disagree that McCandless is indeed being hailed a hero for the time he spent in the wild.

Yes, it is definitely horrendous the way in which he died, but, in my personal opinion, he came across as a selfish and conceited character, who held no care for the people that loved him, therefore, breaking his families hearts. His death could have been entirely avoided had he not been so hubristic and pompous. Also, I think that creating a film out of this was completely the wrong thing to do. What kind of message are we sending out to kids that are easily influenced? This story should be used as a stark warning, not a celebration. I'm glad I read this, and I liked Krakauer's style, despite not agreeing with the way this story was publicised. View all 3 comments. Dec 06, Fabian rated it liked it.

The article written by J. Krakauer was totally enlarged to make this, an obsessive journalistic account of an obsession. I am sure that the core of it is included in this pg book somewhere the anecdote: young incompetent kid dies out in the wilderness ; it should be short and sweet, however it is exhaustively stretched out obviously to capitalize on the popular story to include stories of the own writer himself as a kid conceited!

Also, there's a long but interesting section which includes tales of other intrepid nonconformist isolationists. Why couldn't this kid just learn his lesson on moderation? Had this dude been into heroin instead, the results would have been strikingly similar minus, of course, the book. View all 7 comments. Apr 26, Philip rated it liked it Shelves: nonfiction , biography-autobiography , author-man , philosophy , movie-is-better.

The movie adaptation is one of my all-time faves. Of course, while this book is an unnecessarily expanded version of what was originally an article written by Krakauer, the movie turns it into an epic, dramatized, stranger-than-fiction, based-on-a -true-story biopic of Christopher McCandless. McCandless in the book is still an enigmatic, magnetic, fascinating man, but would I have felt the same if I hadn't already loved Emile Hirsch's portrayal of him? Would I have been affected as mu 3ish stars.

Would I have been affected as much by the touching, powerful relationships he shared with Jan Burres, and Ron Franz if I hadn't been picturing the incredible cinematic performances of Catherine Keener and Hal Holbrook in my mind? McCandless's story is awe-inspiring regardless, but Krakauer stretches it far past the breaking point by including narratives of other, similarly ill-fated explorers including his own experiences , among other frivolous details that I honestly could have done without. One of the uncommon instances where the movie surpasses the book, but I'm not disappointed I read it. Makes me want to get out and go hiking or backpacking; my wife and I have a goal to visit each of the 59 U. Or if nothing else, to watch the movie again. Philip's Library Oct 07, Jonathan Ashleigh rated it it was ok.

I don't know why everyone went so wild over this book or this kid - is there one without the other? It seems like people only cared because it was a Jon Krakauer book that translated well to Hollywood. The guy in the book didn't even have enough material about himself to make a whole book and every other chapter is about some other person who did a similar "disappearance into nature.

Aug 28, Maudeen Wachsmith rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: people who have seen the movie, lovers of the outdoors. I first read Into the Wild ten years ago when it first came out after finding out that parts of it are set in Carthage, Miner County, South Dakota pop. My great-grandmother is buried in Howard, the Miner county seat. So I wondered, how young Chris McCandless, the subject of the book and movie ended up in Carthage in the first place.

Then I read that Sean Penn was finally making a movie adapted from the book and filming in Carthage. I thought it would be really interesting to see Carthage on the big screen. But the trooper he is, he persevered for my sake. The movie adequately told the story of young Christopher McCandless who after graduating from Emory University, took off on a two year road trip, calling himself Alexander Supertramp. Very early on his car was destroyed and he abandoned it, burned what little money he had left and took off on foot. Some one say he was idealist others an adventurer, but others just reckless. Everyone seems to have his or her own opinion. What is clear is that he was found two year later dead in an abandoned bus just north of Denali National Park in Alaska.

However his adventures along the way and the people he met tell a very interesting story. And the just how he died is still fodder for speculation although Krakauer does give his theory. Hirsch as McCandless is wonderful — his portrayal deserves an Oscar nomination as does that of Hal Holbrook as Ron Franz, the elderly recluse who befriends him. Told mostly in flashbacks, the movie suffers from uneven editing. I was also disappointed in the cinematography—the Alaskan scenes could have been brilliant but they were just average. That said, the South Dakota prairie was breathtaking. And it was fun to see Carthage.

I think the entire town was filmed. After watching the movie, I was compelled to read the book again. It was even more meaningful after watching the movie. I read many passages out loud to my husband and told him I thought he might change his opinion of McCandless. He is now reading the book. But no more than many young men. Yes, he did some things wrong. He was actually a smart kid and I found a lot in him to be admired. It was sad he had to die. Any loss of life is sad. And that is what bothers me the most. That a parent lost a child, that a sister lost a brother, that a world lost a promising young man. There are lessons to be learned here, of course, but was the price too great?

Chris McCandless didn't want to prove anything to anyone; he just wanted to be free and live his life as he saw fit. Far from the image of the bohemian and thoughtless teenager Jon Krakauer portrays him to us as an intelligent and obstinate young man with remarkable capacities to unite around him. He leaves to those who have met him during his travels this feeling of great sociability which contrasts significantly with the need for solitude that he regularly showed during his journey, a little t Chris McCandless didn't want to prove anything to anyone; he just wanted to be free and live his life as he saw fit. He leaves to those who have met him during his travels this feeling of great sociability which contrasts significantly with the need for solitude that he regularly showed during his journey, a little the desire to owe nothing to anyone and find alone the solutions to his problems.

When he leaves his family at a young age after high school, he goes from odd jobs to odd jobs and squats where the wind carries him and or fate brings him down. He must have had a lucky star because his meetings always seem benevolent, and this is perhaps one of the elements that will encourage him to push his adventures even further. His thirst for self-sufficiency will guide him to Alaska in a desert place where he will spend several months with the fatal outcome that we know. The author breaks stereotypes and does a real work of investigation by understanding this young man's personality who wishes to break with modern life.

Far from judgment and bias, he analyzes the situation by comparing it to other life paths with similarities with Chris McCandless. It also seems that his death is still a little enigmatic because many news sites on the subject are always looking for the real reason. That's a real interest in this book which brings us back tirelessly to the harsh reality of life outside civilization. Nov 02, Heidi The Reader rated it really liked it Shelves: non-fiction , adventure. Krakauer examines McCandless' history, friendships, and probable motivations while also comparing his case to other young men who died or disappeared in the wilderness.

He also gets very personal and recounts a solo mountain climbing adventure of his own that nearly went south, but didn't- cred "Not all those who wander are lost" seems to be the focus of this non-fiction biography by Krakauer about a young man named Chris McCandless who went into the Alaskan wilderness, but never came out again. He also gets very personal and recounts a solo mountain climbing adventure of his own that nearly went south, but didn't- crediting his survival to luck rather than skill. Into the Wild paints McCandless as a man with a brilliant mind and the soul of an artist, who didn't fit in to the modern world's or his family's view of how he was supposed to be. Four months later his decomposed body was found by a party of moose hunters.

For much of the book, Krakauer tries to figure out what ultimately ended McCandless's life. In the edition I read, he had a new afterword that he penned in April , talking about his definitive theory for why McCandless died. If you haven't read the book since it was published, I really recommend picking up a new edition if only to read that. Krakauer includes actual journal entries from McCandless's wanderings, which I thought gave us a pretty clear window into the man's mind: "It is the experiences, the memories, the great triumphant joy of living to the fullest extent in which real meaning is found. God it's great to be alive! We saw a man who cared about life, about the way he was living, and about the way he interacted with others.

It is curious to me that his relationship with his parents wasn't better, but I'll let Krakauer tell you all about it: "McCandless's personality was puzzling in its complexity. He was intensely private but could be convivial and gregarious in the extreme. And despite his overdeveloped social conscience, he was no tight-lipped, perpetually grim do-gooder who frowned on fun. To the contrary, he enjoyed tipping a glass now and then and was an incorrigible ham. A trancelike state settles over your efforts; the climb becomes a clear-eyed dream. Hours slide by like minutes. The accumulated clutter of day-to-day existence- the lapses of conscience, the unpaid bills, the bungled opportunities, the dust under the couch, the inescapable prison of your genes- all of it is temporarily forgotten, crowded from your thoughts by an overpowering clarity of purpose and by the seriousness of the task at hand.

That passage made me wonder- what sorts of things do I like to do in my life as much as Krakauer loves climbing? It seems to me, that the state of flow he's describing there, would be a place that I would like to dwell in as much as possible. Recommended for folks who like to read about people with unconventional life styles or if you're looking for a book about the human spirit. Into the Wild is a book about why people wander, what they may find, and, sadly, the loved ones they leave behind. Some further reading: Naked and Marooned: One Man. One Island. View all 11 comments. Apr 25, Elizabeth rated it really liked it Shelves: i-own , memoir-bio. I think a lot of the people who have formed negative opinions of this story are really missing the point.

Most people rage on and on about what a terribly selfish, careless idiot Chris McCandless was, to which I say, duh. John Krakauer points out many, many times that Chris was "heedless" and "overconfident. He was fascinated by McCandless, sure, and he certainly seems to have seen a lot of himself in the young man, I think a lot of the people who have formed negative opinions of this story are really missing the point. He was fascinated by McCandless, sure, and he certainly seems to have seen a lot of himself in the young man, but by no means does he gush about what a fantastic person or brave adventurer McCandless was.

Chris McCandless is fascinating to me because, despite how frustratingly foolhardy and arrogant he may come across who's to say really - none of us ever knew him , I am astounded by the number of people who fell head over heels for him in such a short period of time. Grown men and women! It seems impossible that his flaws outweighed his character. The people he met over the course of his travels genuinely seemed to love him, but Chris was just one of those strange individuals who don't really want to be loved. I do hope his parents and sister were able to find peace with McCandless's death. It's very hard to keep giving away your love to someone who simply doesn't want it. Jan 07, J. Sutton rated it really liked it. Krakauer makes the basic facts of Christopher McCandless's trek into the Alaskan wilderness and his death nearly 4 months later clear from the outset.

Even though I'd heard a lot about this case, that's just the beginning of the story. His motivations, especially since graduating college a year earlier, are what make this story interesting. As some of McCandless's ideas about living a new kind of life off the map come into focus, Krakauer continues to highlight the harsh realities McCandless cho Krakauer makes the basic facts of Christopher McCandless's trek into the Alaskan wilderness and his death nearly 4 months later clear from the outset. As some of McCandless's ideas about living a new kind of life off the map come into focus, Krakauer continues to highlight the harsh realities McCandless chose to face.

While what McCandless was trying to do might be appealing to some, Krakauer reminds readers that McCandless was ill-prepared for the dangers. Ultimately, of course, the new life he had fashioned was cut short by tragedy. Dec 16, Jason rated it it was amazing Shelves: , thrill-me-chill-me-fulfill-me , reviewed , wine-club , for-kindle. This is a great book and I was totally enthralled. Yet somehow Krakauer keeps it all grounded, presenting a strategically balanced view of McCandless himself despite what I must imagine to be a profound desire either to glorify him in his admirable quest for self-reliance, This is a great book and I was totally enthralled.

Yet somehow Krakauer keeps it all grounded, presenting a strategically balanced view of McCandless himself despite what I must imagine to be a profound desire either to glorify him in his admirable quest for self-reliance, or to vilify him for the reckless audacity he demonstrated along the way. Or perhaps both. For that he was only a kid, a kid who took big risks as kids are wont to do , but ultimately a kid who just got unlucky.

One thing I kept thinking about while reading this book is the idea of self-reliance. Because it isn't really an absolute, right? There are degrees to which one can be self-reliant. I mean, even Thoreau went into town periodically to buy tools or to barter for whatever. Does that invalidate his approach? Did McCandless take the concept to an extreme by forsaking a map because maps are drawn by other human beings?

The answer to that is YES. View all 10 comments. Jon Krakauer possesses a phenomenal skill in taking a non-fiction story and telling it in a way that does not bog you down in unmemorable details; but instead keeps you engrossed in the unfolding details of what happens next. In this story, Into the Wild , Mr. Krakauer tells the emotional story of a young man… Christopher McCandless, who in April of , hiked into the Alaskan wilderness and never walked out. I listened to the audiobook version of this story and the fine narration was performed Jon Krakauer possesses a phenomenal skill in taking a non-fiction story and telling it in a way that does not bog you down in unmemorable details; but instead keeps you engrossed in the unfolding details of what happens next.

I listened to the audiobook version of this story and the fine narration was performed by Philip Franklin. Although it quickly became apparent to me that Christopher McCandless' story had been widely covered in the national media at that time, I had been personally unaware of the story so it was completely fresh for me. Krakauer tells the story in an entertaining and yet informative manner… he not only attempts to trace the steps of Chris McCandless through McCandless's own writings.. He even relates snippets from his own personal history, seemingly able to personally identify with Chris McCandless and his feelings of wanderlust and his troubled relationship with his father.

Much of Chris McCandless's story is simply conjecture. What IS known is that he came from a well-to-do family outside of Washington, D. After graduating from Emory University in , he cut off all ties to family and friends. McKinley… carrying only a backpack containing a 10 pound bag of rice, a Remington rifle, some cooking utensils, a sleeping bag and an array of paperback books. The portrait of Chris McCandless which takes place in this narrative seems to me to be one that is relatively common for someone his age. Chris McCandless was a contradiction.. He was intelligent, stubborn, had a very strong sense of social justice and seemed acutely aware of the inherent hypocrisy present in society… most especially among those he considered authority figures his father, for example.

At the same time, he could be short sighted, unforgiving at times.. Chris seemed to be simply a young man struggling with his own identity and wrestling with accepting the reality of what it means to be a human being…. One question continued to arise for me as I listened to this story… was Chris McCandless understandable and perhaps even admirable… or was he simply just a foolish and short sighted young man who didn't seem to recognize his own ignorance of what it would take for him to survive in such harsh conditions? I struggled with my feelings about this young man and what he did; but in the end, I would have to say that he was both understandable AND incredibly foolish. As a parent of children who are similar in age to Chris McCandless, I was horrified by his seeming lack of caring about how his parents and siblings must have felt, having no idea where he was, what he was doing… or if he was even alive.

I felt angry over his self-centeredness in not considering the feelings of anyone who cared about him. Oddly, at the same time, I COULD remember sharing some of his feelings when I was young and I also remember that it could be difficult at times to put those feelings in any kind of context…. Ultimately, Chris McCandless's story left me full of sadness at the unnecessary tragedy that befell him.. Just a few short months after walking into the Alaskan wilderness, some hikers discovered his body in an old abandoned Fairbanks City Transit System bus Taped to the door of the bus was a note… "S. I need your help. I am injured, near death and too weak to hike out of here. In the name of God, please remain to save me.

I am out collecting berries close by and shall return this evening. Chris McCandless, August 7? And although Mr. Krakauer did his best to describe the geography of the locations in the story, I found some of the details confusing as I'm unfamiliar with Alaskan geography. Perhaps this geographic confusion was better addressed in the print copy of this book. Regardless, I definitely recommend this book. View all 40 comments. Another well-written book by Jon Krakauer, this was a fascinating, and often sad, glimpse into the spiral down of an idealistic young man, Christopher McCandless. Even when his decision-making didn't make sense, the reader still somehow identifies with the internal struggle this young man was going through, and his journey becomes theirs to take with him.

It seems terrible to say I enjoyed this book, but I really did. If nothing else, it allowed me to identify with someone else's struggles, whil Another well-written book by Jon Krakauer, this was a fascinating, and often sad, glimpse into the spiral down of an idealistic young man, Christopher McCandless. If nothing else, it allowed me to identify with someone else's struggles, while seeing from a safe distance the fallacy in their thinking. Aug 14, Diane rated it it was amazing Shelves: outdoors , favorites. I love this book so much that I have not yet been able to write a traditional review.

The story of Chris McCandless resonated deeply with me, and Jon Krakauer's writing gave me insight into loved ones who reminded me of Chris. I have reread "Into the Wild" many times over the years, and each time I have found something new to appreciate. My paperback copy is heavily marked and underlined, and it is so dear to me that I never plan on giving it up. One of these days I hope I can bring myself to wr I love this book so much that I have not yet been able to write a traditional review. One of these days I hope I can bring myself to write more about this amazing work.

Highly recommended for anyone who loves the great outdoors, or for those who know what it is like to search for something deeper than yourself. Favorite Quotes: "I have always been unsatisfied with my life as most people live it. Always I want to live more intensely and richly. More even than most teens, he tended to see things in black and white. He measured himself and those around him by an impossibly rigorous moral code. I disappointed my father in the usual ways. Like McCandless, figures of male authority aroused in me a confusing medley of corked fury and hunger to please.

If something captured my undisciplined imagination, I pursued it with a zeal bordering on obsession. If he ever in his entire life admitted to being wrong, I wasn't there to witness it. Instead, I felt oppressed by the old man's expectations. It was drilled into me that anything less than winning was failure. In the impressionable way of sons, I did not consider this rhetorically; I took him at his word. And that's why later, when long-held family secrets came to light, when I noticed that this deity who asked only for perfection was himself less than perfect, that he was in fact not a deity at all — well, I wasn't able to shrug it off.

I was consumed by a blinding rage. The revelation that he was merely human, and frightfully so, was beyond my power to forgive. He was looking for more adventure and freedom than today's society gives people. In , however, there were no more blank spots on the map — not in Alaska, not anywhere. But Chris, with his idiosyncratic logic, came up with an elegant solution to this dilemma: He simply got rid of the map. In his own mind, if nowhere else, the terra would thereby remain incognita. But the stereotype isn't a good fit. McCandless wasn't some feckless slacker, adrift and confused, racked by existential despair. To the contrary: His life hummed with meaning and purpose.

But the meaning he wrested from existence lay beyond the comfortable path: McCandless distrusted the value of things that came easily. He demanded much of himself — more, in the end, than he could deliver. View all 5 comments. Mar 20, Ron rated it it was amazing Shelves: tragedy , non-fiction , Maybe he would have come back to that future, his family, a career, the life that most of us live. It's impossible to say. After two years of wandering our country's West, mostly by foot, he successfully hitchhiked to Alaska and walked into the wild along a broken path called The Stampede Trail a dream of his, the draw of the wilderness.

He did not come out. To the great white north Since this would be the second time I've read this book about Chris's two-year journey, I admit that I am one too. I don't know exactly why his story resonates deep feelings within me, but I think it's many things. What Chris did and how he died is polarizing. Some admire, others fume. He gave his savings to charity, drove west, and told no one he was leaving, not even his sister whom he typically shared most everything with. Just why he cut his parents from his life is up for debate, but it seemed mostly to do with a toxic relationship and a personally damaging secret held by his father.

If Chris did nothing else, he lived for truth. At a young age, it's easier to believe in absolute truths, but nevertheless, scars had been formed. Two months later, Chris now calling himself Alex lost the use of his car in a sudden flash flood within the desert near Lake Mead. The loss of this last major material possession only served to spur him forward. The simplicity of one day and the beauty that nature offers became his ideal existence, as he traveled by foot, by thumb and rail.

For two years he cut a circle thousands of miles long across the western States before finally heading north. You'd think a person like Alex, a rolling stone, would make no friends along the way. But he touched many, and within such short time frames. With those he trusted, he shared his true name, and more. Correspondence, postcards, and his values. When he finally walked into the Alaskan wilderness, Chris had already experienced a majority of what he had sought.

Into the wild-jon krakauer overthink it : Make easier decisions, stop second-guessing, and bring more joy to your into the wild-jon krakauer. There are degrees to which into the wild-jon krakauer can be self-reliant. I decided I couldn't believe Personal Narrative: My Life In Paoli a God who would let something that into the wild-jon krakauer happen into the wild-jon krakauer a boy like Alex.

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