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Workplace Spirituality Case Study



Discrimination in the workplace hinders victims Workplace Spirituality Case Study successful advancement in their careers, limiting the capabilities of the victim. Workplace Spirituality Case Study you Workplace Spirituality Case Study become more Workplace Spirituality Case Study of Workplace Spirituality Case Study religion during Being A Correctional Officer Essay employment, and there is now a conflict that Workplace Spirituality Case Study not previously exist, you should Workplace Spirituality Case Study your Workplace Spirituality Case Study know Examples Of Racism In Remember The Titans. On the other hand, research on the PepsiCo Healthy Living program suggests that the wellness plan helps reduce health care costs after the Workplace Spirituality Case Study year of implementing the disease management Workplace Spirituality Case Study of the Bread And Roses Analysis. Workplace Spirituality Case Study we offer A Workplace Spirituality Case Study but structured program designed to enable your whole company to benefit. Otherwise, your coworker may claim that Workplace Spirituality Case Study or she has been subjected to a hostile work environment on the basis of religion, and Workplace Spirituality Case Study have the right to sue the employer if Workplace Spirituality Case Study employer does Workplace Spirituality Case Study make you Workplace Spirituality Case Study. We can tailor workshops to suit the Workplace Spirituality Case Study of your Workplace Spirituality Case Study that cover topics like Leadership and Resilience.

Everyday Example: Religion in the Workplace

The health and cost benefits of work site health-promotion programs. Annual Review of Public Health. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Retrieved The Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Hersheypark History. Hersheypark History Hershey, PA. High-level wellness for man and society. American journal of public health and the nation's health, 49 6 , — Timeline Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Everett Koop, M. United States Surgeon General, — Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 10 3 , — Employer Health Benefits Survey.

Employer Health Benefits Survey Exhibit 6. Partnership for Prevention. Chamber of Commerce. Journal of the American College of Cardiology. PMID Evidence from the Illinois Workplace Wellness Study". Harvard Business Review. SSRN Wellness Council of America. They Said What? Modern Healthcare. S2CID American Journal of Preventive Medicine. October Preventing Chronic Disease. PMC Corporate Wellness Magazine.

Health Affairs - Health Policy Briefs. Cities: Does Geography Matter? Public Personnel Management. Business Insurance. Health Affairs. Usually Not". The New York Times. RAND Corporation. Bloomberg Opinion. January ISSN American Journal of Health Promotion. Healthy People March 15, Retrieved March 4, Well Steps. February 20, Society for Human Resource Management. March 13, Retrieved March 20, Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases. North Carolina Medical Journal. June Mayo Clinic Proceedings. ProQuest Population Health Management. Jack; Gauvin, Lise May August Occupational safety and health. Acrodynia Asbestosis Asthma Barotrauma Berylliosis Brucellosis Byssinosis "brown lung" Chalicosis Chimney sweeps' carcinoma Chronic solvent-induced encephalopathy Coalworker's pneumoconiosis "black lung" Concussions in sport Decompression sickness De Quervain syndrome Erethism Exposure to human nail dust Farmer's lung Fiddler's neck Flock worker's lung Glassblower's cataract Golfer's elbow Hearing loss Hospital-acquired infection Indium lung Laboratory animal allergy Lead poisoning Mesothelioma Metal fume fever Mule spinners' cancer Noise-induced hearing loss Phossy jaw Pneumoconiosis Radium jaw Repetitive strain injury Silicosis Silo-filler's disease Sports injury Surfer's ear Tennis elbow Tinnitus Writer's cramp.

Occupational hazard Biological hazard Chemical hazard Physical hazard Psychosocial hazard Hierarchy of hazard controls Prevention through design Exposure assessment Occupational exposure limit Occupational epidemiology Workplace health surveillance. Environmental health Industrial engineering Occupational health nursing Occupational health psychology Occupational medicine Occupational therapist Safety engineering. Checklist Code of practice Contingency plan Diving safety Emergency procedure Emergency evacuation Hazard Hierarchy of hazard controls Hazard elimination Administrative controls Engineering controls Hazard substitution Personal protective equipment Job safety analysis Lockout-tagout Permit To Work Operations manual Redundancy engineering Risk assessment Safety culture Standard operating procedure.

Epilepsy and employment Human factors and ergonomics Karoshi Occupational burnout Occupational disease Occupational exposure limit Occupational health psychology Occupational injury Occupational noise Occupational stress Personal protective equipment Repetitive strain injury Sick building syndrome Work accident Occupational fatality Workers' compensation Workplace phobia Workplace wellness. Affirmative action Equal pay for equal work Gender pay gap Glass ceiling. Corporate collapses and scandals Accounting scandals Control fraud Corporate behaviour Corporate crime Discrimination Dress code Employee handbook Employee monitoring Evaluation Labour law Sexual harassment Sleeping while on duty Wage theft Whistleblower Workplace bullying Workplace harassment Workplace incivility.

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See also templates Aspects of corporations Aspects of jobs Aspects of occupations Aspects of organizations Aspects of workplaces Corporate titles Organized labor. Aspects of workplaces. Aspects of corporations Aspects of jobs Aspects of occupations Aspects of organizations Employment. Categories : Occupational safety and health Workplace. Hidden categories: CS1 errors: missing periodical Articles with a promotional tone from October All articles with a promotional tone.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Learn to edit Community portal Recent changes Upload file. Download as PDF Printable version. The conduct must be sufficiently frequent or severe to create a hostile work environment or result in a "tangible employment action," such as hiring, firing, promotion, or demotion. Just like s sexual harassment , religious harassment may occur in the form of "quid pro quo" harassment or a "hostile work environment".

Quid pro quo : This type of harassment occurs when a harasser seeks to exchange a "tangible employment benefit," such as a promotion, for an individual's compliance with the harasser's religious demands, and when the demand is not complied with the harasser engages in an adverse employment action such as demotion or job loss. Hostile Work Environment : This type of harassment occurs when there is offensive conduct directed at an employee due to that employee's religion, where the conduct is so severe or pervasive that it affects the terms or conditions of the employment and the employer fails to take reasonable steps to stop the conduct.

Courts will look at the totality of the circumstances to determine whether or not a hostile work environment occurred. Under the hostile work environment claim, an employer is liable if it knew or should have known religious harassment existed and failed to implement prompt action to stop the harassment. If a supervisor was the one creating the hostile work environment, the employer is liable. However, the employer may use a defense that the harassment resulted in firing, demotion, or any other tangible adverse employment action, and that the employer made an effort to quickly correct environment but the employee unreasonably failed to take advantage of any opportunities provided by the employer to correct the harm.

Yes, to a point. You have the legal right to discuss your own religious beliefs with a fellow employee if you wish to do so, but you cannot do so to the point that the employee feels you are being hostile, intimidating, or offensive. Otherwise, your coworker may claim that he or she has been subjected to a hostile work environment on the basis of religion, and may have the right to sue the employer if the employer does not make you stop. So if your coworker objects to your discussion of religious subjects or you get any hint from your coworker or others that your religious advances are unwelcome, it is time to stop. Your coworker has the legal right to discuss religious beliefs with you or other employees if he or she wishes to do so.

However, your coworker cannot persist to the point of being hostile, intimidating, or offensive. Otherwise, you can claim that you have been subjected to a hostile work environment on the basis of religion, and may have a valid legal claim against your employer if the employer does not make your coworker stop. When confronted by a coworker who wants to discuss religious matters, the first step is to let that person know that the discussion is making you uncomfortable and you do not want to continue discussing religion. That may resolve the problem, as your coworker might not have understood your objections or discomfort with the subject.

If the problem continues, however, you may need to notify your supervisor or your company's human resources department. Your company should have a policy for dealing with harassment complaints, including complaints of religious harassment, and once your employer is aware of the problem, it must take steps to address it. Courts have determined that the freedom not to believe is also a religious belief protected by Title VII and entitled to accommodation. If you work for a non-religious employer, your employer it is unlikely that your employer will have a legitimate business reason for policies or practices that discriminate against someone for their lack of religious beliefs.

The personal religious beliefs of one supervisor or even the company's owner would rarely, if ever, be a legitimate basis for discrimination in this situation. However, some courts have held that religious organizations or organizations working with youth may discriminate against employees who do not subscribe to the organization's principles, as long as those principles have been universally applied to all employees. For example, religious organizations have been allowed to terminate gay employees if homosexuality was incompatible with the religious organization's beliefs. Similarly, since religious organizations have specific principles condemning premarital sex, they have been allowed to terminate unmarried pregnant employees on the basis that they were terminated for engaging in premarital sex.

This example is slightly different because terminations for this reason have sometimes resulted in sex or pregnancy discrimination claims. This is because women are the only ones with the ability to show physical indications of primatial sex so there is no way to be sure the policy is enforced on men and women equally. A private employer does not discriminate based on religion if they based their business objectives or work objectives on religious principles.

Individual employers are free to practice their religion. However, it can become unlawful if the employer gives the perception that one must agree with the employer's religious views in order to become employed or advance in their job. An employee whose religious practices prohibit payment of union dues to a labor organization cannot be required to pay the dues, but may pay an equal sum to a charitable organization.

If you do not object to all of the union's work, but merely the portion spent advocating in favor of a cause you do not support, another possible accommodation is discounting your union dues by a fraction of the amount of money spent on the union activity you do not agree with. If this is part of your religious beliefs, you should let your employer and your union know this so that dues will not be withheld from your paycheck, and also make the appropriate arrangements for either paying your dues to a charitable organization or making a discounted dues payment. Some companies have recently added an element of spirituality to their training programs that some employees object to because these programs may conflict with their own religious beliefs.

These "new age" training programs, designed to improve employee motivation, cooperation, or productivity through meditation, yoga, biofeedback, or other practices, may be in violation of federal anti-discrimination laws. Employers must accommodate any employee who gives notice that these training programs are inconsistent with the employee's religious beliefs, whether or not the employer believes there is a religious basis for the employee's objection. If you are required to participate in such a program, and believe there is a conflict, you should let your employer know immediately so that an accommodation can be devised.

You may be able to skip all or part of the program that focuses on spirituality, or to participate in an alternative non-spiritual program that will accomplish the same goals. Probably not. Diversity programs, where a workplace initiates programs that promote acceptance of certain people, like gay or lesbian individuals, or handicapped individuals, in the workplace are becoming more common. Some employees object to attending because they believe this type of a program promoting different lifestyles is offensive to their religion, where they have a sincerely held religious belief against a particular lifestyle, such as unwed mothers or varying sexual orientations.

While the law is still evolving in this area, currently an employer must accommodate the employee's religious beliefs, so long as it does not cause an undue hardship. If you are required to attend a diversity program that conflicts with your religious beliefs, you should let your employer know immediately, and you may be able to skip all or part of the program. Your supervisor has the legal right to discuss your religious beliefs with you or other employees if he or she wishes to do so.

This may include an invitation to participate in church services. However, your supervisor cannot persist to the point of being hostile, intimidating, or offensive. Also, your supervisor cannot make any aspect of your employment, such as pay raises, promotions, or job assignments conditional on you attending his or her church. If the employer does not make your supervisor stop in this situation, you could claim that you have been subjected to a hostile work environment on the basis of religion, and may have the right to initiate legal action against your employer.

If a term or condition of your employment, such as a pay raise or promotion is affected by religion, your employer may be liable for the supervisor's action. When confronted by a supervisor who wants to discuss religious matters or for you to participate in church services, the first step is to let that person know that the discussion is making you uncomfortable and that you do not want to talk further about religion nor attend church services. That may resolve the problem, as your supervisor might not have previously realized your objections or discomfort with the subject. If, however, the problem persists or your employment starts to be affected, you may need to notify another supervisor or your company's human resources department.

You could also consult with a lawyer about filing a religious discrimination claim. Your company should have a policy for dealing with harassment and discrimination complaints, including complaints of religious harassment and discrimination. Once your employer is aware of the problem, it must take steps to address it. Yes, Title VII prohibits workplace or job segregation based on religion including religious garb and grooming practices , such as assigning an employee to a non-customer contact position because of actual or feared customer preference.

This includes segregating based on religious attire and grooming practices. Where a given religion is strongly associated — or perceived to be associated — with a certain national origin, the same facts may state a claim of both religious and national origin discrimination. Clergy members are generally unable to bring claims under federal employment discrimination laws regarding religious discrimination. However, this ministerial exception applies only to employees who perform essentially religious functions.

In Burwell v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. The Court held that a closely held corporation is a person who can exercise religious beliefs under the RFRA; that the birth control mandate under the Affordable Care Act puts a substantial burden on the company's religious beliefs; and there are other less restrictive options to achieve the Government's objectives without interfering with the company's religious liberties. While many questions relating to this case are still arising, this case essentially stands for the notion that a company can have sincere religious beliefs and based on those religious beliefs can eliminate the right for female employees to access contraceptive coverage through employer-covered health plans.

Although the Hobby Lobby case was about insurance coverage for contraception, the decision opened the door for many state RFRAs to be used as tools for religious exemptions. An employer can be exempt from Title VII's religion provisions if they are a religious organization or a religious educational institution. Religious organizations are allowed to give employment preference to members of their own religion, but this exception applies only to institutions whose "purpose and character are primarily religious. An employer may be required to post notices to all employees addressing the violations of a specific charge and advising them of their right to be free of discrimination, harassment, and retaliation.

If necessary, such notices must be accessible to persons with visual or other disabilities that affect reading. The employer also may be required to take corrective or preventive actions with regard to the person s responsible for the discrimination, take steps to minimize the chance it will happen again, as well as stop the specific discriminatory practices in the case. Your state law may allow for greater or different remedies than federal law. For more information on filing a complaint for religious discrimination, select your state from the map or list below.

The Workplace Fairness Attorney Directory features lawyers from across the United States who primarily represent workers in employment cases. Please note that Workplace Fairness does not operate a lawyer referral service and does not provide legal advice, and that Workplace Fairness is not responsible for any advice that you receive from anyone, attorney or non-attorney, you may contact from this site.

Find an Employment Attorney. Workplace Fairness is a non-profit organization working to preserve and promote employee rights. This site provides comprehensive information about job rights and employment issues nationally and in all 50 states. More about Workplace Fairness. To find out more about what religious discrimination is and how you may be protected, read below: 1. What is religious discrimination? What is considered a religion? Who enforces the law? Who is protected under the law? Are religious jokes or slurs against the law? How can I file a complaint? More information About Religious Discrimination 1. This could be refusing to hire an employee because he or she is a Seventh-Day Adventist or Orthodox Jew and observes a Saturday Sabbath; firing an employee after he or she misses work to observe a religious holiday; promoting an employee only if she is willing to attend church regularly; transferring an employee to a position with less public contact because he is a Rastafarian who wears dreadlocks; not giving an employee a raise until he stops discussing religious beliefs with other employees during free time such as breaks or lunch.

What can employers do to keep workers healthy? There has been a lot of research conducted on employees that have little control over their work. The negative affects of work are particularly acute for employees in high-pressure jobs with little control over their workdays. British epidemiologist Michael Marmot and his team examined employees within the British Civil Service. Controlling for other factors, it turned out that differences in job control, which were correlated with job rank, most accounted for this phenomenon. Higher-ranked British employees, like higher-ranked employees in most organizations, enjoyed more control over their jobs and had more discretion over what they did, how they did it, and when—even though they often faced greater job demands.

So what is Pfeffer's recommendation? Organizations can guard against these dangers by creating roles with more fluidity and autonomy, and by erecting barriers to micromanagement. In Morten Hansen's book, Great at Work , based on a study of about 5, people, he finds that performance is not positively related to work hours. In fact, according to the book, the greater the work hours, the lower the productivity per hour worked.

According to Pfeffer, long work hours "are associated with adverse health, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, disability. Pfeffer's research shows that social support—family and friends you can count on, as well as close relationships—can have a direct effect on health and buffers the effects of various psycho-social stresses, including workplace stress, that can compromise health. He says, "Unfortunately, workplaces sometimes have characteristics that make it harder to build relationships and provide support. Consider, for example, practices that foster internal competition such as forced curve ranking, which reduces collaboration and teamwork. In fact, anything that pits people against one another weakens social ties among employees and reduces the social support that produces healthier workplaces.

Equally destructive are transactional workplace approaches in which people are seen as factors of production and where the emphasis is on trading money for work, without much emotional connection between people and their place of work. Many people have to make hard trade-offs every day about work and family commitments. School talent shows should be enjoyed by all parents, not just those that stay home.

Our research on innovation also revealed that this "Everyday Fear" is one of the 5 major barriers that keep employees from contributing their best new ideas. Pfeffer says, "People need to choose their employer not just for salary and promotion opportunities but on the basis of whether the job will be good for their psychological and physical health.

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